Tag Archives: speaker for the dead

On the Bookshelf V

The Wages of Spin by Carl Trueman
Critical writings on historical and contemporary evangelicalism. It took me all of five pages to decide that Carl Trueman is one of my favorite writers. No joke. I’m simultaneously loving this guy and feeling very small next to his brilliance. I mean, seriously – if I could write non-fiction like Trueman and write fiction like Cormac McCarthy, I’d be set.
Speaker for the Dead by Orson Scott Card
The second installment of Enderverse, and a winner of the Hugo and Nebula awards. It’s quite a bit different from the first book, Ender’s Game, but it’s every bit as interesting and provocative. Card has a gift for ambitious, detailed world building (or out-of-this-world building, if you will), and his characters and scenarios are always fascinating. It’s not difficult to see why he’s regarded as a classic Sci-Fi author.
Modern Times by Paul Johnson
I was a bit daunted by the length of this one at first (it’s 800 pages), but the fact that it’s authored by Paul Johnson helped me overcome my hesitation. That, and the fact that I really had no choice in the matter – it’s required reading for school. At any rate, I’m glad I started it: it’s brilliantly written and consistently challenging. Dashed interesting, too.
I Am Legend by Richard Matheson
A classic and oft lauded post-apocalyptic vampire tale. The 2007 film is one of my favorite Sci-Fi flicks, but I avoided the book until now because I’d heard questionable things about it. A very good friend recently recommended it, however, so I decided to give it a go. I picked up a copy at Barnes & Nobles the other day, and as soon as I finish up some of my other reads, I plan to start it. Can’t wait.
The Fort by Bernard Cornwell
A novel of the Revolutionary War. Cornwell is a prolific author, highly respected and generally regarded as one of the best  historical-fiction writers working today. I haven’t read anything else by him yet, but I figured this would be a good place to start. He also wrote a novel about the Battle of Agincourt which I’d love to check out. “We few, we happy few, we band of brothers…”
Outlaw Platoon by Sean Parnell
“In combat, men measure up. Or don’t. There are no second chances.” The story of 10th Mountain Division’s stand in the violent, rugged mountains of Afghanistan. I’m almost done with it and have been very impressed thus far. There’s a lot of profanity (you have been warned), but it’s a remarkable look at leadership, brotherhood-in-arms, and the messiness of modern warfare.

What’s on your bookshelf right now?