On the Bookshelf XXII

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Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Faulkner dubbed it the “the best novel ever written”, and I can see where he’s coming from. Until now, my only experience with Tolstoy had been The Death of Ivan Ilych, which I enjoyed but wasn’t blown away by. But this book… wow. Just wow. Leave it to a Russian with a epic beard to write something this fantastic.
Cities of the Plain by Cormac McCarthy
“In this final volume of The Border Trilogy, two men marked by the boyhood adventures of All the Pretty Horses and The Crossing now stand together, in the still point between their vivid pasts and uncertain futures, to confront a country changing or already changed beyond recognition.” McCarthy has yet to disappoint me. I don’t know how the story will end, but I know it will be magnificent.
Institutes of the Christian Religion, Vol. II by John Calvin
One down, one to go. And Calvin is being a boss, as usual.
Wool by Hugh Howey
YES. FINALLY. I’ve been aching to get my hands on this one since last year. I love the story behind it: Howey wrote it while working as a bookseller, writing faithfully each morning and during every lunch break for nearly three years. He self-published in 2011, and the book has since become an underground hit (Ridley Scott has even purchased the film rights). So yeah: I’m only slightly excited to see what all the buzz is about.
Her Hand in Marriage by Douglas Wilson
Something tells me this is gonna be a really, really good read: “The modern dating system is bankrupt. It does not train young people to form a relationship but rather to form a series of relationships, hardening themselves to all but the current one… Biblical courtship is a humble affront to the sterility of modern relationships. And as a new generation rejoices in this ancient wisdom, the current waves of broken relationships will begin to recede.”
In Defense of Sanity edited by Ahlquist, Pearce, & Mackey
It’s a collection of essays by G.K. Chesterton. And it’s awesome (duh). What more do want to know?
Why We Love the Church by Kevin DeYoung & Ted Kluck
From J.I. Packer: “Two young men, a pastor and a layman, here critique the criticisms of the institutional church that are fashionable today. Bible-centered, God-centered, and demonstrably mature, they win the argument hands down. As I read, I wanted to stand up and cheer.” While we’re on the subject, I’d like to recommend the other book these guys wrote, Why We’re Not Emergent. Seriously. Go read it. They make a terrific team.

What’s on your bookshelf right now?

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3 thoughts on “On the Bookshelf XXII”

  1. Okay. I seriously need to start reading Anna Karenina. :)
    And Wool – that intrigues me! I can’t wait to hear what you think of it.
    Her Hand In Marriage and Why We Love the Church are both on my TBR list. :)

    And you already know what’s on my bookshelf. Chesterton, Pascal, Milton, and O’Brien. I can hardly handle all the awesomeness. ;)

    1. Yes, Allie – Anna Karenina is a must. You’re gonna love it. :) I’ll let you know how Wool goes; I’m currently trying to knock out a few other reads first, before I start it, but I have high hopes. As for Her Hand in Marriage, I would’ve started it already, but I’m waiting for Mom to finish it. Then Dad wants to read it. So I’m waiting in line, so to speak. ;)

      Ah, yes. Chesterton, Pascal, Milton, O’Brien. So much awesomeness. I’m sure you’ll handle it alright. ;)

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