Book Review: Wordsmithy

wordsmithyAs I said in a previous post, the next best thing to writing is reading about writing. And if I were to gather my favorite writing books and pile them on the floor, I imagine it would look like this:

Somewhere near bottom would be Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style. It’s not that I don’t appreciate this book – remember, it’s still in my favorites pile – but I don’t love it the way others do. I see as it essential reading, but I don’t see it as the Holy Writ of writing guides.

Next up would be William Zinsser’s On Writing Well and Stephen King’s On Writing: A Memoir. The first is sharp, winsome, and delightful (I reviewed it here). The second is a gritty, unvarnished look at one man’s journey as a writer. After reading it, I had a deeper appreciation for King’s work and what was behind it.

At the top of my favorites pile would be Wordsmithy by Douglas Wilson. Though not a memoir, it is similar to King’s book in that it addresses not just writing, but the writing life. What sets the two apart is how they approach the subject. King has a treasure trove of wise and insightful observations, but his outlook is pagan, atheistic, and often pretty bleak. Wilson’s is staunchly Christian to the core.

I don’t care if you plan to make a career of writing, or merely have a passing interest in it – this book should be on your shelf. It’s an immensely rewarding read for those who want to “sling ink” full time, but most of the tips are such that anybody can profit from them.

The book is short – a mere 120 pages – but I think Wilson has inherited Lewis’ ability to pack into one sentence what most writers pack into three or four. He lays out and explains “a veritable Russian doll of writing tips”: seven exhortations for people who wish to cultivate the wordriht life.

  1. Know something about the world
  2. Read
  3. Read mechanical helps
  4. Stretch your routines
  5. Be at peace with being lousy for awhile
  6. Learn other languages
  7. Keep a commonplace book

I’ve already discussed his advice on keeping a commonplace book and the way he shoots down faux-humility in writing. My favorite tip, however, would have to be the first one: know something about the world.

By this I mean the world outside of books. This might require joining the Marines, or working on an oil rig or as a hashslinger at a truck stop in Kentucky. Know what things smell like out there. If everything you write smells like a library, then your prospective audience will be limited to those who smell like libraries. (p. 10)

An apt reminder for those of us who are tempted to think that the writer’s life happens almost exclusively behind closed doors with a stack of paper and a stack of books. As Thoreau put it, “How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.”

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9 thoughts on “Book Review: Wordsmithy”

  1. Nice review! I think I’m even more impressed, though, with the sheer number of book reviews you crank out (and the number of books you must be reading).

  2. I read this book in one sitting because I can’t put it down. This was my second favorite book of this year. I think it’s also useful for me as a preacher and also for sharpening the rhetorical side of an apologist. I loved how helpful it is and Wilson’s wit definitely encourages one to pick up one’s own sense of humor and desire to be a wordsmith. I reviewed this book here: http://veritasdomain.wordpress.com/2012/08/09/review-of-wordsmithy-hot-tips-for-the-writing-life-by-doug-wilson/

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